Event Title

Live Demo #1: The Research Trail

Start Date

12-5-2022 1:10 PM

End Date

12-5-2022 1:40 PM

Document Type

Presentation

Description

In this game based on the tabletop version of The Oregon Trail, players will undertake a perilous research journey in order to arrive at court with the relevant sources required for success. Players will encounter frightful calamities, such as sudden internet shutdowns, as well as helpful characters, like the supportive Shepard, along the way. Gameplay will involve individual and collective decision-making as well as evaluations of resources and strategies. The purpose of this game is to enable students to survey the research process while identifying different types of sources and the connections between them.

In this session, attendees will play the game themselves and learn how to implement it as a formative or summative assessment. Attendees will also be able to see how the game can be used as a springboard for class discussion as well as for students to review and develop a deeper understanding of the research process.

Speaker Bio

Jessica de Perio Wittman is the Director of the Law Library and Associate Professor of Law at UConn Law School. She teaches Advanced Legal Research, Technology and Law Practice, and Special Education Law. She received her J.D. from Seattle University School of Law and her M.L.S. from the University at Buffalo. Her research interests focus on the incorporation of nontraditional teaching techniques to enhance diversity and inclusion in the classroom, the development of technology competencies for today’s law students, and the intersection of social media and the law. Jessica has held many leadership positions within the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) and continues to be a member of AALL, Law Librarians of New England (LLNE), Southern New England Law Libraries Association (SNELLA), and the Connecticut Bar Association. She is a frequent presenter at AALL and other professional conferences, where she speaks on various topics related to law librarianship and legal education.

Tanya Johnson is a Research and Instruction Librarian at the UConn School of Law, where she provides reference services, including research assistance and instruction, to all library patrons. She is also an adjunct professor, teaching Advanced Legal Research, Diversity & Inclusion in the Legal Profession, and Research for Social Justice. Her research interests include the application of critical and alternative pedagogies in legal education and the adoption of equitable policies and practices in both law librarianship and the legal profession. She earned her J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, where she served as an editor on the University of Pennsylvania Law Review, and her M.L.I.S. from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, where she received the LITA / Ex Libris Student Writing Award from the Library and Information Technology Association, a Division of the American Library Association. Prior to her library work, Tanya practiced law at large and mid-size law firms, specializing in First Amendment law and complex litigation, and served as a Deputy Law Clerk for a Justice on the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania.

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May 12th, 1:10 PM May 12th, 1:40 PM

Live Demo #1: The Research Trail

In this game based on the tabletop version of The Oregon Trail, players will undertake a perilous research journey in order to arrive at court with the relevant sources required for success. Players will encounter frightful calamities, such as sudden internet shutdowns, as well as helpful characters, like the supportive Shepard, along the way. Gameplay will involve individual and collective decision-making as well as evaluations of resources and strategies. The purpose of this game is to enable students to survey the research process while identifying different types of sources and the connections between them.

In this session, attendees will play the game themselves and learn how to implement it as a formative or summative assessment. Attendees will also be able to see how the game can be used as a springboard for class discussion as well as for students to review and develop a deeper understanding of the research process.