Event Title

Cards Against Case Law! And Other Ways to Enhance Student Learning and Engagement

Start Date

31-5-2019 10:45 AM

End Date

31-5-2019 11:45 AM

Document Type

Presentation

Description

Student engagement in legal research classes can be difficult, especially when the time allotted to instruct is limited. Applying gamification in the classroom increases student engagement, improves student learning outcomes, and provides a non-traditional method of formative assessment. This session includes a pedagogical discussion of gamification, an examination of ways that gamification has been used in first year and advanced legal research courses, and a practical activity in which participants will utilize the techniques discussed to create their own games for legal research instruction.

Speaker Bio

Jessica de Perio Wittman serves as the Director of the Law Library and Associate Professor of Law at the University of Connecticut School of Law. Professor de Perio Wittman directs all library operations and oversees the day-to-day operations of the information technology systems, equipment and services for the law school campus. She teaches Advanced Legal Research, Technology and Law Practice, and Special Education Law. Her research interests focus on assistive and adaptive technologies and its intersection with the law and libraries.

Tanya Johnson is a reference librarian at the University of Connecticut School of Law, where she provides reference services, including research assistance and instruction, to all library patrons. She earned her J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, where she served as an editor on the University of Pennsylvania Law Review, and her M.L.I.S. from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey.

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May 31st, 10:45 AM May 31st, 11:45 AM

Cards Against Case Law! And Other Ways to Enhance Student Learning and Engagement

Student engagement in legal research classes can be difficult, especially when the time allotted to instruct is limited. Applying gamification in the classroom increases student engagement, improves student learning outcomes, and provides a non-traditional method of formative assessment. This session includes a pedagogical discussion of gamification, an examination of ways that gamification has been used in first year and advanced legal research courses, and a practical activity in which participants will utilize the techniques discussed to create their own games for legal research instruction.